248688 Taran Adarsh

Siskiyaan Movie Review

1
Siskiyaan Movie Rating

It's very important to connect with the story that's unfolding on screen. If the moviegoer can identify with the goings-on, the job is accomplished. But if the moviegoer does not, the effort evaporates into thin air.

SISKIYAAN is more of an experiment. The film talks of three characters and the story is set in one single night. The film does raise plenty of issues, but at the end of it, the viewer isn't convinced.

Why? Two valid reasons...

Reason 1: SISKIYAAN bears a striking similarity to DANSH [Kay Kay, Sonali Kulkarni, Aditya Shrivastava], released exactly a month ago. Agreed, not many people ventured into movieplexes to watch DANSH, but the plot is out in the open. And the plot is the type that caters to a thin segment of viewers!

Reason 2: SISKIYAAN is too talk-heavy/verbose and one-dimensional. Again, the makers may reason that this form of cinema is meant for the thinking audiences. But the execution is the type that wouldn't completely satiate even the elite/mature audiences.

All said, SISKIYAAN neither enlightens, nor entertains. It doesn't fit into the arthouse slot or commercial cinema. And walking on a tightrope can result in losing the balance and falling...

A tale of retribution and revenge, SISKIYAAN tells the story of Ayesha's [Neha Dhupia] diligent search for justice at any cost. Ayesha has been unable to break free of painful memories of her morbid past -- that she had been raped continuously for three days by a doctor at a relief camp, soon after the Gujarat riots.

Through a chance encounter, she stumbles upon the very man who had probably tormented her. Will her husband, Javed [Sachin Khedekar], be able to lend her the support that she expects at such a crucial point?

Is Ayesha right in assuming that she has finally found her culprit in Dr. Vishwas [Sonu Sood] or is this just a case of wishful thinking?

SISKIYAAN is inspired by acclaimed director Roman Polanski's DEATH AND THE MAIDEN [1994; Sigourney Weaver, Ben Kingsley, Stuart Wilson], which was adapted on stage by I.P.T.A., called RAAT. Ideally, it's an interesting subject for stage, not celluloid. A one-night story that focuses on three characters, with discussions revolving around rape and riots, SISKIYAAN tackles a genre that the Indian moviegoer isn't too keen to embrace whole-heartedly.

Another problem with SISKIYAAN is that it not only gets talk-heavy after a point, but boring as well since all that the lady wants is a confession and the guy denies that he had committed the rape. The twist in the tale comes only in the last fifteen minutes, but the viewer has run out of patience by then.

Also, the entire conversation about Sachin Khedekar heading the committee to introspect the riots looks of little consequence in the narrative. For an average cinegoer, it only adds to his boredom.

SISKIYAAN is basically about a woman who seeks answers, justice, revenge. A different and difficult subject without doubt and director Ashwini Chaudhary handles certain portions of the film well. But, as mentioned above, what may interest the writer [Sanjay Chauhan] or director may not necessarily interest the moviegoer and in this case, it doesn't!

Cinematography [Arun Varma] is okay. The film has just one track [rendered by Bhupinder] and its rendition is perfect. Dialogues are well worded, especially in the climax. The background score [Surinder Sodhi] is low-key.

Neha Dhupia enacts her part with complete understanding. The actor has gradually evolved into a convincing performer and her performance in SISKIYAAN will only compel film-makers to offer her roles of substance. Her outburst towards the finale [on the cliff] is excellent.

Sachin Khedekar proves yet again that he's an accomplished actor who can handle the most difficult roles with admirable ease. Sonu Sood doesn't impress much initially, but is impactful in the penultimate reels.

On the whole, SISKIYAAN neither enlightens, nor entertains. A dry subject, it won't find flavor with either the mature audiences or aam junta.

Siskiyaan 1 Taran Adarsh 20050930