290201 Taran Adarsh

Hyderabad Blues 2 Movie Review

1.5
Hyderabad Blues 2 Movie Rating

HYDERABAD BLUES initiated the trend of Hinglish films in India. It truly signaled the birth of a cinema that was part realistic and catered to an audience that was looking for a change.

Nagesh Kukunoor's HYDERABAD BLUES 2 -- REARRANGED MARRIAGE takes off where HYDERABAD BLUES ended. In that respect, HYDERABAD BLUES 2 is a true-blue sequel, but those expecting the second part to be another witty, light-hearted fare will be sorely disappointed.

HYDERABAD BLUES 2 is about a marriage going on the rocks for a supposedly extra-marital affair. The film has its share of interesting moments, but the way the subject has been treated, it caters to a very niche audience.

Varun [Nagesh Kukunoor] is now married for six years. He has everything that he desires -- a great job, a great wife, a great social life... And no kids!

Varun's wife Ashwini [Jyoti Dogra] wants to start a family, but Varun is not prepared for it. Ashwini decides to try anything, which includes learning the techniques necessary to seduce a man from Shashi Aunty [Anu Chengappa]. In this endeavour, she is aided by her best friend Seema [Elahe Hiptoola], who runs a marriage bureau.

Seema's husband Sanjeev [Vikram Inamdar], Varun's friend, clueless as always, offers perfectly useless advice only to alleviate his problems.

In this already chaotic atmosphere, enters a vivacious, no strings attached Menaka [Tisca Chopra] as Varun's new floor manager at the call center he owns. Attraction is imminent, leading to further complications in the already strained relationship between Varun and Ashwini.

Through this marital upheaval, Varun and Ashwini are supported by their faithful friends who act as their respective sounding boards and dispensers of unlimited free advice.

Nagesh Kukunoor follows the same pattern of narrating the story in HYDERABAD BLUES 2. The film has light moments aplenty, especially in the initial reels, and it makes digs at just about everything under the sun. But the story does an about-turn and gets serious in the post-interval portions, when the couple decides to go in for a divorce. The narrative suddenly changes from a frothy, harmless entertainer to a serious, adult fare. And that's where it falters!

The film takes a dip in the post-interval portions as the couple decides to go separate ways. The pace drops at regular intervals, getting boring at places, and though the end is well executed, the viewer does get restless by the time the film reaches the finale.

The problem with HYDERABAD BLUES 2 is that the viewer would saunter into the theatre expecting to watch a light entertainer, but what unfolds is a complete contrast. Kukunoor's story may have appealed then, when he attempted the first part, but he stumbles this time around.

The script of the film is its biggest drawback. Tisca's character in the film is supposed to be oh-so-professional, but she suddenly turns into a seductress. Why? Even when Tisca decides to quit, there are no explanations offered. Even the wife's behavior towards her husband is unpalatable and her sudden change of heart towards the end contradicts her character completely.

Kukunoor enacts the main character with ease. Jyoti Dogra is a fine actress, but her appearance should've been more presentable. Vikram Inamdar contributes enormously in making the goings-on appealing. Elahe Hiptoola is equally competent. Tisca Chopra does well in a small role, which should've been better developed.

On the whole, HYDERABAD BLUES 2 is not a patch on its first part. At the box-office, it has something for the multiplex audience, that's it. But even that segment won't be completely satisfied.

Hyderabad Blues 2 1.5 Taran Adarsh 20040602