308945 Joginder Tuteja

Chashme Baddoor Movie Review

2.5

EXPECTATIONS


You expect a fun score in Chashme Baddoor, a film coming from the house of David Dhawan. Since the filmmaker has time and again relied on feisty music to do the trick and there is no dull moment in majority of soundtracks to have come out of his stable, one doesn't expect anything different in this Sajid-Wajid score which has lyrics by Neelesh Misra, Jalees Sherwani and Kausar Munir.


MUSIC


Based on the popular mobile jingle, the opening track of Chashme Baddoor is titled 'Har Ek Friend Kamina Hota Hai'. The song has the kind of tune, pace and singing involved that it could well have been a Govinda chartbuster way back in the 90s. In fact right from the arrangements to the choice of instruments to the way Sonu Nigam goes about singing this one reminds of Govinda-David Dhawan combination that had once ruled the roost. For someone who has time and again come up with poetic lyrics, there is a good range that Kausar Munir shows as she puts together 'Har Ek Friend Kamina Hota Hai'.


Another lyricist who shows a different facet of his writing skills is Neelesh Misra. He lets his hair down for 'Dhichkyaaon Doom Doom' which is sung quite well by Ali Zafar and Shreya Ghoshal. Reminding of the kind of fun songs that were quite popular way back in the 70s, it is quintessentially R.D. Burman from start to the finish and has a good coming together of melody and rhythm to it. In fact one can't help but remember Kishore Kumar and Asha Bhosle singing this one for Rishi Kapoor and Neetu Singh as the song impresses in a major way. Leave aside the title of the song that may seem senseless, this one has a lot more going for it in its two versions with Wajid deciding to come behind the mike as well.


There is a good dose of rap that is thrown in before Sonu Nigam (and later Ali Zafar) gets going with 'Early Morning'. This one comprises of the words Chashme Baddoor, though one can't really term it as a title song. Though it tries to fuse style from the 50s, 60s and the current times, somehow it just doesn't turn out to be perky enough to make you go for it all over again. Perhaps this Jalees Sherwani written number may find some added visibility after being seen on screen but audio wise it just about passes muster, especially the Ali Zafar version which tries to be different but doesn't quite go all the way.


The song that takes the album back on track and once again steps into the 90s zone is 'Ishq Mohallah'. In fact this time around Sajid-Wajid pay tribute to Laxmikant-Pyarelal, especially from the chorus perspective. For those who may not be familiar with LP's work, they relied a lot on putting together correct chorus with some elaborate orchestra in the background. This is what one gets to hear in 'Ishq Mohallah' which would have made Manmohan Desai happy, the man who has been the role model for David Dhawan. With Neelesh Misra getting his lyrics to suit the situation, Wajid and Mika Singh bring on fun.

Fun continues with Neuman Pinto doing well as a backup vocalist for Wajid and Ali Zafar sung number 'Andha Ghoda Race Mein Dauda'. Okay, so one may squirm reading the song's title which has been put to words by Jalees Sherwani. However the song promises to be immense fun when heard and seen along with the film's narrative. This one is set as a true blue 'kameene-friends-pulling-each-other's-legs' and with a rock setting, it indeed is an experiment that works for the film's storytelling. This may not be heard for years to come but in the film should fit in well.


OVERALL


Chashme Baddoor isn't a soundtrack that you take home and sing along. However while it is being played, there is no dull moment whatsoever. There may not be many memorable elements attached to this Sajid-Wajid score here but along with the film, these songs should ensure a speedy narrative to keep the pace on for the audience.


OUR PICK(S)


'Dhichkyaaon Doom Doom', 'Har Ek Friend Kamina Hota Hai', 'Ishq Mohallah'

Chashme Baddoor 2.5 Joginder Tuteja 20130220

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