362531 Joginder Tuteja

Music review of Margarita With A Straw by Joginder Tuteja

2.0

Music: Mikey McCleary, Joi Barua

Lyrics: Prasoon Joshi (Hindi), Mikey McCleary (English)

Music Label: Zee Music Company


Expectations


Honestly, it came across as a huge surprise when I realized that Margarita With A Straw actually had a designated soundtrack against its name. The second surprise was to realize that it was pretty loaded with as many as eight tracks in it. The third surprise was to be made aware of the fact that names like Prasoon Joshi & Mikey McCleary were associated with the film in the capacity of lyricist and composer respectively. With the songs spanning 30 odd minutes, I was prepared for some more surprises that were in the offering.


Music


In the series of surprises, the one that appeared right at the beginning of the album was 'Dusokute', a fun-n-peppy number that was miles away from what one expected from a film that is being perceived as an offbeat affair. A love song with a difference, it is miles away from a quintessential Bollywood number and has an identity of its own. Put together by Joi Barua who composes as well as sings this one, 'Dusokute' has a Western base to it and entertains right through the duration it plays in its duet version (with Sharmistha Chatterjee) as well as the solo version.


The fun mood continues with Sonu Kakkar bringing herself behind the mike for 'Foreign Balamwa'. From this point on, it is Mikey McCleary's show all the way and he yet again comes up with a tune which doesn't have any Bollywood influences to it. As a matter of fact, this one has a jingle feel to it, though one wonders if this fusion feel of folk, contemporary and Western was indeed required here. Though Sonu Kakkar has delivered quite a few chartbusters, there is something amiss in this one, as the song despite being energetic doesn't quite hold on well for its entire duration.


The album is quite high on female singers and this is what one evidences for the immediate next number, 'Choone Chali Aasman'. For this one, Rachel Varghese goes into an out and out Western avatar when it comes to the core rendition, hence putting you off a little as the lyrics are all in Hindi. If this was an English song, it would still have been understandable to utilize Rachel's services since her vocals are powerful indeed. However, for a Hindi number it just doesn't cut ice, more so since this one is a philosophical number about life and hence doesn't even belong to the kind that can become popular on being sung around.


Yet another high impact voice is heard next when Anushka Manchanda arrives on the scene. The singer has seldom disappointed and it isn't any exception here as she gives a good account of herself all over again with 'Meri Aadat Mera Hissa'. Still, just like the song preceding it, it has a Western base to it and is quite heavy-duty on lyrics when it comes to taking a philosophical route. Hence it eventually has a very low shelf life as there isn't much in there for a listener to revisit, other than just appreciating the effort that has gone in to do something different.


Now this is something that one could pretty much see coming, what with an English number following next which is titled 'I Need A Man'. Vivienne Pocha goes all out with impressing with her thumping vocals and with a stage and setting that could well belong to a Moulin Rouge outing, composer Mikey McCleary demonstrates his good command over the medium. If picturized well and fitted correctly into the narrative of the film, this one could well leave an impact.


Another English number that follows soon after is 'Don't Go Running Off Anytime Soon'. The love song has a rather sweet appeal to it and credit for that must go to Mikey McCleary who does quite well as a singer here. There is a boyish charm in the way he sings this one, hence making it a smile-through number which could well have fitted into a Hollywood outing. This one should fit in perfectly well into the narrative of Margarita With A Straw.


Rajnigandha Shekhawat, who excels in classical music and singing, is brought on board for 'Aai's Aalap'. Creating a somber mood, something which also breaks the sound that had otherwise been build during the course of the soundtrack, this one is paced rather well with a sound of piano in the background.


The soundtrack rounds off with 'Laila's Theme', the concluding track, which pretty much takes off from where 'Aai's Aalap' left and has a serene feel to it. With a three minute duration to it, 'Laila's Theme' should do well with the narrative of the film.


Overall


The music of Margarita With A Straw was bound to be different and in that aspect, it fits in well. It is clear that the idea behind this soundtrack was not to explore any commercial gains but to fit in well into the stage and setting that the film stands for. In that aspect, it plays on just fine.


Our Pick(s)


'Dusokute', 'Don't Go Running Off Anytime Soon', 'I Need A Man'

Margarita With A Straw 2.0 Joginder Tuteja 20150409