353865 Joginder Tuteja

Music review of Tamasha by Joginder Tuteja

4.0

EXPECTATIONS

A.R. Rahman's music can often be tricky. You may not really get bowled over, you may get hooked on to it right away or you give it a few listening before it starts - as the cliched goes - growing on you. Hence, you wait to hear the entire soundtrack of Tamasha at least a few times before passing a verdict. With Irshad Kamil as the lyricist, you are sure though that it would be a classy score in the offering.

MUSIC

The start is just perfect for Tamasha as an immensely catchy number, 'Matargashti', is heard first. With a European sound to it, one also gets a strong sense of Hindi film music from the 60s (which was in itself inspired by European music) in this foot tapping number which is fun, lively, spirited, energetic and quite easy on ears. Mohit Chauhan lets his hair down for this playful number, which has unique lyrics and makes you hear this one quite closely, especially when references to Dev Anand films are made. A chartbuster from the word 'go'.

The fun continues with the number 'Heer Toh Badi Sad Hai' which again has a 60s/70s style to it. This time around, Rahman ropes in Mika Singh who is clearly enjoying himself behind the mike. Though one would have expected a sad outing with a song that carries a title like this, it actually turns out to be quite spirited with words like 'utter mad', 'very bad' and 'sad'. Nakash Aziz chips in well too for this Lakshmikant-Pyaarelal kind of song that carries good vintage feel to it and would turn popular soon enough.

It is after a hiatus that the voice of Alka Yagnik is heard and what makes it all the more remarkable is that a regular with Nadeem-Shravan makes a comeback of sorts with A.R. Rahman no less. Now this is one track that gets into the Jab Tak Hai Jaan mode as the mood of the album shifts from being playful to romantic. Titled 'Tum Saath Ho', this one has a quintessential A.R. Rahman sound to it with a slow pace and soothing orchestra that makes for an out and out love song. While Alka Yagnik leads the charge, Arijit Singh joins in half way through the proceedings. A decent number, which would take time to grow.

The real 'dhamaka' comes immediately after though in the form of 'Wat Wat Wat'. With the sound of 'dhol' beats kick-starting the proceedings, one knows there and then that this one has an eye on youth. Moreover, funny lyrics by Irshad Kamil further make this one a fun track which is bound to be aided further by attractive picturisation and choreography. Arijit Singh and Shashwat Singh come together for this song that later also appears in a 'Vengeance Mix' that has beats doing the trick. Expect this one to gain popularity in quick time to come.

Since the film is titled Tamasha, it was pretty much on the cards that a 'tamasha' would be pretty much on display in the film as well. A musical theater show is evidenced through 'Chali Kahani', a situational outing, which remains high spirited and energetic right through. With elaborate arrangements pepping up this five and a half minute long piece, it is spearheaded by Sukhwinder Singh who gets good support from Haricharan and Haripriya. This one should look good on screen once the narrative is on.

Lucky Ali is heard after a hiatus and it is always a pleasure to hear his vocals. Especially with A.R. Rahman as the composer, one expects nothing less than magical once Lucky Ali takes over the mike. This is what happens in 'Safarnama', which comes at just the right time when back to back energetic numbers like 'Wat Wat' and 'Chali Kahani' necessitated a pause soon after. With minimal instruments in the background, this ear pleasing number could well be the journey song of Tamasha and make for an eye pleasing big screen viewing.

Next to arrive is a near four minute long instrumental piece, 'Parade De La Bastille', which is an out and out European track and hence carried an international appeal to it. Mid-way through the track there is fun element that comes in when the base sound of 'Matargashti' is heard all over again. This one should be a good fit into the storytelling of Tamasha.

The album concludes with 'Tu Koi Aur Hai', which is the lengthiest of them all, what with its duration being over seven minutes. A. R. Rahman brings himself behind the mike for this immensely soothing number that makes you listen to it attentively, lest a nuance is lost. A beautiful love song which moves on at a slow pace and immerses you well into the sound that warrants no distractions whatsoever, 'Tu Koi Aur Hai' - also featuring the vocals of Alma Ferovic and Arjun Chandy - is as classy as it gets and gives a right culmination to Tamasha.

OVERALL

The soundtrack of Tamasha delivers more than what on expected from it and is a good mix of classy and massy score. While one can't miss the characteristic touch of Rahman in the Irshad Kamil written songs, what makes the score special is the fact that there are a few instantly catchy numbers as well which ensure that commercially too, Tamasha would do well in quick time.

OUR PICK(S)

Matargashti, Heer Toh Badi Sad Hai, Wat Wat Wat, Safarnama, Tu Koi Aur Hai

Tamasha 4.0 Joginder Tuteja 20151019

User Reviews

Sunny155

Suprb song.... A.R. Rahman sir hats off..... fr his song..... sweet lyrics...

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